Home About Modelguns Modelgun Videos Site Map Mgun Accessories UK-VCRA

Shotguns

Tanaka Works

WWI   /  WWII

U.S. M1897 TRENCH GUN

M1897 Trench Gun Video

             
                         
             
                         
             

Example of : Tanaka Works : U.S. M1897 Trench Gun

Includes :  Instructions,  2x Tanaka 12 Gauge cartridges and 1x box of PFC caps

The Tanaka M1897 functions Exactly like the real U.S. M1897, with genuine wood stock and fore-grip and bayonet fixing

Construction: Real wood stock, fore-grip,  Heavyweight abs and metal parts

Field strippable

Weight:  2.7Kg

Length:  39 Inches 

Barrel Length: 19 1/2 Inches

Open Barrel

Capacity:  6

Cartridge Power: 2x 7mm PFC primer caps
 

Accessories for the Tanaka Shotgun

 

Cartridges:  1x Box (6x Tanaka 12guage cartridges)  :     

Leather Sling :      

Tactical butt-stock cartridge holder nylon (holds 6 cartridges) :       

Bayonet :                      
Tanaka Works M1897 Bayonet:  Metal with wood grip handle

Brief Info on the Trench Gun

Remington  Trench guns, saw action in the trenches of France The trench gun soon garnered a reputation as a fearsome close-range arm, and the Germans even lodged official diplomatic protests against its use stating it was against the Hague Convention governing the rules of warfare. The German Army threatened to execute every American soldier found in possession of a shotgun 

Following the Armistice in 1918, the trench guns remained in service with the U.S. Army and Marine Corps where they saw use in some “hot spots” in the Caribbean and China “between the wars

The Pearl Harbour attack found the United States military short of all manner of arms, year before the British had abandoned most of their firearms at Dunkirk and the British Government was forced to purchase every and any type of firearm including shotguns

The Ordnance Department gave contracts to several commercial firms for shotguns. There were three basic types procured during World War II; trench guns (with bayonet adapters and hand guards).

Remington Arms Co. turned out riot and training gun variants of its Model 11 auto loading shotgun, and Savage Arms Co. produced a number of the almost-identical Model 720 riot guns and training guns. Some of these shotguns saw combat use in most theatres of the war and, as was the case in World War I, they proved to be highly effective for close-range combat applications these were also used to some extent in Korea and Vietnam.

Shotguns are effective in close areas and trenches but not effective when the range exceeds 30m. Most Armed forces have a shotgun on their inventory today whether they are used depends on the expected action!

The Model 1897 created quite a stir when American troops showed up on the front lines of World War I. It became known as a "trench broom" because U.S. soldiers quickly adapted it to trench warfare. U.S Dough Boys developed a technique for clearing a section of battlefield by having several soldiers roll into the trench with their Model 1897's at the ready.

It was a coordinated effort, said to be conceived by General John J. "Blackjack" Pershing. It required soldiers to hit the ground and face both directions in the trench. The first man would quickly empty his shotgun; six rapid fire rounds of buckshot, then fall to the ground. The second shot gunner would repeat the process, followed by a third, fourth, etc. A distinct feature of the Model 1897 was that it had no trigger disconnector so holding down the trigger and simply pumping the action could empty the magazine.

The trench gun, the military model, became so feared by the Germans that they tried to get shotguns "outlawed" for use in combat (and these were the guys using mustard gas). However, the shotgun concept was fixed doctrine in the U.S. military and the Model 1897 saw service in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam and even the Gulf War. All branches of the U.S. armed forces have used the Model 1897 shotgun.